Why Integrity Matters

Truth WebsiteHonesty is Always the Best Policy. At least that’s what the poster says.

But aren’t there exceptions to every rule? Zig Ziglar, author of Born to Win, doesn’t think so. He insists, “The most influential persuasion tool in your entire arsenal is your integrity.” Your decisions reflect who you are and what you value. Integrity is your Swiss army knife in your integrity tool box. Others listen to your words, but believe your actions.

As a writer, I often choose words and speak in metaphor, but I am a literal listener. I listen so hard to hear the truth that I sometimes miss what people are saying (which may or may not be the words they are actually speaking).  I value the truth.  My fiance, Pat, calls me “Julie-I-Can-Not-Tell-a-Lie-Connor.” Honesty was a quality that was shaped in childhood and saved me from tripping over my own tongue on more than one occasion.

For example …

I liked order in my classroom. I loved the sounds of buzzing conversations and students engaged in active learning, but I valued structure and organization.  I understood, as an urban middle school teacher, that order in our classroom was the only place where many of my students experienced structure and security.

I built time into the schedule to scoot desks into place and restore order in the room at the end of every class period.  On one particular afternoon, I was tired.  I was cranky.  And I had a headache.  My grouchiness increased as I weaved between small groups of students while repetitively picking up carelessly-tossed wads of paper on the floor,

“Please use the trash can,” I thoughtlessly shouted.  “I am tired of picking your _____ off of the floor.”

Silence.

I was more shock ed than my students when I heard – we heard – a profanity fall from my mouth.

The students leaned towards me.  Words on a black-and-white poster above my desk stared at me:  Honesty is Always the Best Policy. I had choices.  I could lie and say I actually used a different slang term and accuse them of inciting an argument.  Or I could act like nothing happened.  I had five seconds to make a decision.

I tried lying when I was in third grade.  It didn’t work out very well.  But I remembered the lesson.

When I was in third grade, the athletic club at my parochial elementary school sponsored an annual fundraiser.  Students sold paper stickers with the words “Proud Sponsor of the Corpus Christi Athletic Club” for one dollar.  The boy and girl who sold the most stickers received ten dollars.  I wanted to be the top-selling award-winning girl in the school.

I asked my teacher for ten stickers.  The following day, I asked for ten more stickers.

“Did you sell the ten stickers I gave you yesterday?” she inquired.

Well, I’m going to sell them, so …

“Yes, ma’am,” I replied.  “I sold the stickers.”

Two weeks later, I had a collection of 80 stickers hidden under my socks in a drawer.

On the last day of the fundraising drive, I cried and refused to go to school.  I told my mom what happened.  I thought I could sell them, but I couldn’t.  She pulled her checkbook out of her purse and began to write a check for ten dollars.

“What are you doing?” my father asked.

“I’m writing a check,” answered my mother, explaining what I’d done.

I tried to look pitiful and small.

“Absolutely not,” he insisted.

“But, why not?” my mom asked.

And then he spoke the words that changed my perspective about truth and truth-telling for the rest of my life.

“She got herself into this,” he replied.  “She can get herself out of it.”

I wanted to die.  Well, not die.  I wanted to live in another country.  On another planet.  And I didn’t know how to explain the truth to my teacher.  I was late for my first class because I trudged very slowly to school.  I didn’t want my teacher to know that I lied. I think she already knew.

I crept into the classroom and quietly returned the stickers to my teacher.  All 80 of them.

“But didn’t you say you sold all of the stickers?” asked my teacher.

“Yes, ma’am,” I replied.  “I lied.”

She said nothing.  I was grateful.

My classmates, however, were not as kind as my teacher.

“What happened?” they chanted.  “I thought you said you sold all of the stickers?”

“I lied.”

“I lied” was a miserable mantra that I repeated throughout the rest of the day.  At the end of the painfully-long afternoon, I resolved I would never lie again.  Ever.  Well, as close to never as I could get.

Forty years later, I could not run away from the uncomfortable situation I created with my students.  Their eyes glistened.  I could tell by their trust-filled expressions that they expected a response from me.

“Something just happened, didn’t it?” I asked.

“Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeessss!” they gleefully answered.

“I’m sure this wasn’t the case,” I continued, trying not to laugh.  “But there’s a chance I might have said an inappropriate word.  Is that true?”

“Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeessss!”

“I am so sorry,” I apologized.  “I did not speak to you with the respect that you deserve.”

“Oh, don’t worry about it, Miss Connor,” Jordan laughed.  “We talk a lot worse than that!”

That was true.

“You could have lied,” said Toya.

“Yes, I could have lied,” I agreed.  “But we both would have known the truth.”

They nodded.  Our honesty with one another led us into a deeper relationship that was grounded in mutual trust and class continued.  Order had been restored.

Later that afternoon, Pat called and advised me to be careful while I was driving home after school.

“It’s raining cats and dogs out there!” he warned.

Now, I know better than to believe that.  Cats and dogs are not falling out of the sky.  But, did I just hear thunder … or was it barking?

On February 3, 2014, posted in: Blog by

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8 Responses to Why Integrity Matters
  1. Julie, I appreciate both your integrity and your sharing about it! I think wanting to feel better lurks behind most lies but people tend to forget lying itself is a misery.

    My husband Rick tells me I’m a terrible liar. I take it as a compliment. 🙂

    Keep shining your inspiring light, my friend.

  2. Hi Julie

    As per usual, what a great article! As well as providing us with powerful principles to govern our lives by, I love your honesty/transparency/vulnerability … what a great role model you are Julie!

    As teachers of very young children we frequently have `show and tell` sessions. Your story reminds all us adults that it is more important to `show and tell`. A friend from long ago put it this way, “monkey see, monkey do.”

    • Oh, my goodness. That is certainly the truth, Merv. I know others, including students … especially students … pay attention much more to our example than our words. They look for congruency: “monkey say, monkey do.” 🙂
      Have a wonderful day!
      Julie

  3. I remember the CC Booster Contest every year… I won that Contest selling just a lil over 200 of them one year. I am sorry to hear that you had such a painful day when quite possibly I was celebrating the $10 win. I did have a secret weapon to getting them sold. Each day after School I would stand outside of the 905 liquor store on West Florissant & sell them to all the drunks. The year before I won, my sisters friend Ruth Crow had won….I was soo jealous I was determined to win after that. $10 was a huge amount of money for a child…I ended up buying a nice Big Radio for my room with that money that cost $10 at the 905 store.

  4. I am so lucky that I get to hear a piece of your wisdom through your blog! I couldn’t agree more with the points you presented and on MY favorite topic. Honesty and Integrity. Another WOW from me!

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